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Paris Climate Agreement India Commitment


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The UNEP report stresses the need for even more urgent action to improve measures to curb the fight against climate change. If global greenhouse gas emissions do not fall by 7.6% per year between 2020 and 2030, the world will not be on track to meet the 1.50C temperature target set by the Paris Agreement. 97% of the 184 climate promises, which were presented after the adoption of the Paris Agreement in 2015-16 and that only six countries have revised their commitments are the same as the 184 climate pledges originally presented in 2015-16 after the adoption of the Paris Agreement, and only six countries have revised their commitments – four countries have strengthened their emissions reduction plans and two nations have scaled back their commitments. Heads of state and government from around the world are meeting this week in Madrid to focus on implementing the Paris Agreement. The conference began in a scathing context with the latest report of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), which will sound the alarm for stronger action. Although India is one of the few countries on track to meet its Paris commitments, all countries in the world need much more. However, it also recognizes the importance of voluntary commitments. The 2015 Paris Agreement is the first global commitment of its kind to address the climate crisis. The pioneering agreement led 195 countries (with the EU) to sign a single agreement to keep global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius, while doing everything in its power to limit the rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Chandra Bhushan, an independent climate expert in India, criticised the UEF report on oversimplification of climate change. The exit letter published today with representatives of the Government and Indian partners highlights India`s progress in areas such as renewable energy, transport, green buildings and the energy sector.

The release letter also examines India`s progress on energy access targets, climate change resilience efforts and reducing air pollution; and to highlight India`s growing presence in international cooperation on climate protection. The Prime Minister stressed that India was committed to saving its citizens and its economy from the COVID 19 pandemic, while mitigating the effects of climate change. According to the report, out of a total of 184 commitments, only 36 were deemed “sufficient” due to emission reduction commitments of at least 40% by 2030, and 12 were deemed “partially sufficient” for their emissions reduction commitments of between 20 and 40% and 136 commitments, some or all of which were “insufficient”. In order to build a low-carbon future and curb climate change, the Indian government has committed to deploying expansionary solar and wind capacity and taking a series of ambitious actions to combat climate change. As a result, the country has made good progress in achieving its goals under the Paris Agreement. He said the problem with these reports was that they were looking at all climate change from a too simple perspective, because they put all countries in the same basket. Despite its low per capita emissions, India has made significant commitments under the “Intended Nationally Determined Contribution” (NDC) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) presented in 2015 as part of the Paris Agreement. As part of the Paris Agreement, India made three commitments. The intensity of India`s greenhouse gas emissions in its GDP will decrease by 33-35% compared to 2005 by 2030. In addition, 40% of India`s energy capacity would be based on non-fossil fuel sources. At the same time, by 2030, India will create an additional “carbon sink” of 2.5 to 3 billion tonnes of Co2 equivalent through additional forest and tree cover. Read more: [Interview with Sir Robert Watson] “The fight against climate change and biodiversity loss is in India`s economic and best interest for development”