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Mutual Agreement


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Once the parties have agreed on a reciprocal agreement, the parties must respect the terms of their agreement. In order to mitigate the risk of pressure on the employee, the French labour code strictly regulates the signing of a dismissal by mutual agreement, each step being intended to ensure that the employee gives his consent to the termination of his employment (including a period of withdrawal and the necessary approval by the Labor administration). Based on the above information, we recommend that the employee sign an acknowledgement of the signed termination contract. To say to each other is that something has been done together. To better understand the concept, we first define the term “reciprocal.” If negotiations are successful, the business parties will reach a reciprocal business agreement to outline the roles, responsibilities, rights and benefits of each company. Markets are an example of a paradigm of a self-generating or spontaneous social order (Hayek 1973, p. 37), i.e. social arrangements in which participants` activities are spontaneously coordinated, through mutual adaptation or adaptation of separate decision-makers, without conscious and central direction. In this sense, the market order “as a particular type of social structure” (Swedberg 1994, p.

255) may be opposed to the deliberate and centralized coordination of activities within companies or organizations, i.e. within social entities such as “family, factory, factory, business, company, company and all associations, as well as all public institutions, including governments” (1973). 46). One of the central themes of F. A. Hayek`s work is that the distinction between the “two types of order” (Hayek 1973, p. 46), the market and the organization (Vanberg 1982) is fundamental to an adequate understanding of the nature of social phenomena in general and market order in particular. The lack of adequate recognition of the nature of the market as a spontaneous social order is, according to Hayek, a great source of confusion in discussions on economic theory, and in particular on economic policy, confusion which he attributes in part to the ambiguity that is implied when the term “economy” is used to describe the market order.

Since the term is derived from the Greek word oikonomia, which means domestic economy, “an economy in the strict sense is an organization or agreement in which someone deliberately assigns resources to a uniform order of extremities” (Hayek 1978, p.